Because we still have a long way to go...

Léa and Alexe are best friends. Nothing could come between them, not even Alexe’s battle with cancer. That’s because, in spite of the difficulties and the devastating recurrences, they are not giving up hope thanks to people like Léa’s father, who has dedicated himself to the cause by riding a bicycle year-round in support of the Tour CIBC Charles-Bruneau.

The generous makers

Thank you to all the talented and generous contributors to this project. Special thanks to Jean-Michel Blais for his wonderful song.

...even after 25 years

Current statistics on pediatric cancer

Thanks to you, the past 30 years have been marked by groundbreaking advances in research on pediatric cancer treatment. Together, we’ve saved the lives of Charlie, Nathan, Laurent and thousands of other Québec children. For them, this signifies the right to a long life full of joy, happiness and adventure. But by no means is our work done. As long as Alexe, Charles, Frédéric and the next child to receive a cancer diagnosis are not cured, we cannot cease our efforts to support research. These children are counting on us.

Solutions to current concerns:

Researchers are guided by two main objectives:
  • Cure the 20% of children whose cancer is resistant to treatment.
  • Improve the quality of life of children in remission so that they can enjoy a full recovery, free of side-effects and complications.
Objectives of the Fondation and the Tour CIBC 2020:
  • Increase the chances of recovery of children with cancer by financing research and projects in the area of pediatric hematology and oncology
  • Raise a record amount of donations, considering that last year the Fondation collected $5,350,000 through its Tour CIBC Charles-Bruneau event

2,000

The number of Québec children diagnosed with cancer annually.

The number of Québec children diagnosed with cancer annually.

0-5 years old

The age at which half of children with cancer receive their diagnosis.

The age at which half of children with cancer receive their diagnosis.

from 30% to 80%

The progress achieved in recovery rates since 1980.

The progress achieved in recovery rates since 1980.

1/400

The number of Québec children who receive a cancer diagnosis.

The number of Québec children who receive a cancer diagnosis.

4

The number of Charles-Bruneau centres treating Québec children with cancer.

The number of Charles-Bruneau centres treating Québec children with cancer.

100%

The objective of recovery with no side-effects set by the Fondation Charles Bruneau.

The objective of recovery with no side-effects set by the Fondation Charles Bruneau.

Testimonial from specialist

Read the testimony

Elie Haddad, M.D., Ph.D.

Our objective is not to achieve an 85% chance of recovery: we want that figure to reach 100%... and we’re not dreaming. We’re determined to achieve this, and achieve it we will.

Read the testimony

Our stars

Find out who Alexe is

Alexe

ALEXE GAGNON – age 17

Find out who Lyanna is

Lyanna

LYANNA MASSÉ – age 5

Find out who Nathanael is

Nathanael

NATHANAEL BLANCHETTE – age 15

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“What we know, deep in our hearts, is that research is what makes a difference. When research studies are carried out in Québec, children across the province benefit from the resulting treatments five to 10 years before others do. Our objective is not to achieve an 85% chance of recovery: we want that figure to reach 100%... and we’re not dreaming. We’re determined to achieve this, and achieve it we will. For years, progress was at a standstill. Then, two revolutions in cancer treatment occurred. Our wish is that Québec children will reap the benefits from these major advances, and thanks to the Fondation Charles-Bruneau, they are. Thanks to donations from the Fondation Charles-Bruneau, research teams at Ste-Justine have been able to show that there are new cancer categories. This is extremely important, as these forms of cancer are treated differently than those that were treated beforehand. Now, we have a newfound ability to make a precise molecular diagnosis, whereas these treatments were simply not available five or even four years ago. That’s why this is nothing short of a revolution, one that’s completely changing the paradigm and the way that physicians treat their patients. As part of the second revolution, immunotherapy also made it possible to save children who, not so long ago, found themselves without therapeutic resources. Research is what provokes change at the outset of treatment of this disease, and it is research that continues to drive positive change. Donating to research means giving to these children, for their care; it means giving for greater survival and improved quality of life, and it means better adapting treatment to each individual child. When we compare our situation with that of others, we see that the Fondation Charles-Bruneau’s contribution is absolutely unique, and we’re fortunate that it’s there for us. We can never thank the Fondation enough.”

Elie Haddad, M.D., Ph.D.
Head, Research Axis, Immune Disorders and Cancers,
CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre

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ALEXE

Alexe was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma, a form of bone cancer, in April 2014. She was 11 years of age. Alexe was forced to put her life on hold to fight the disease. On December 24, 2014, after a few months of hospitalization during which she received a stem cell transplant, Alexe finally obtained permission to return home from her physician: “There was no trace of the disease left. It had all disappeared! However, the physician warned that there was a risk of recurrence, but could not say when it might arise: two, three, six months, a year down to road, we had no idea,” said her mother. Since 2014, Alexe has been a model of perseverance and courage. Through her involvement with the Fondation Charles-Bruneau, and her infectious smile, she is always ready to raise awareness and take part in fundraising initiatives aimed at advancing research. At the time of shooting this film marking the 25th Tour CIBC Charles-Bruneau, Alexe had just learned that she was dealing with yet another recurrence, her fourth.

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ALEXE

Alexe was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma, a form of bone cancer, in April 2014. She was 11 years of age. Alexe was forced to put her life on hold to fight the disease. On December 24, 2014, after a few months of hospitalization during which she received a stem cell transplant, Alexe finally obtained permission to return home from her physician: “There was no trace of the disease left. It had all disappeared! However, the physician warned that there was a risk of recurrence, but could not say when it might arise: two, three, six months, a year down to road, we had no idea,” said her mother. Since 2014, Alexe has been a model of perseverance and courage. Through her involvement with the Fondation Charles-Bruneau, and her infectious smile, she is always ready to raise awareness and take part in fundraising initiatives aimed at advancing research. At the time of shooting this film marking the 25th Tour CIBC Charles-Bruneau, Alexe had just learned that she was dealing with yet another recurrence, her fourth.

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LYANNA

Lyanna was diagnosed with a Wilms’ tumour in August 2019, after experiencing recurring back pain. Lyanna was thus not able to enter elementary school, as she had to undergo an emergency kidney ablation and then start chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments. She is known to the staff at CHU Sainte-Justine’s Charles-Bruneau pavilion as a little ball of energy who loves to talk and is always in good humour in spite of it all. After two additional months of treatment, Lyanna will be in complete remission. She will have dealt with this ordeal like a champion, with great courage and the support of her friends at the hospital.

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MAÉLYA

À venir

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NATHANAEL

Nathanael is enrolled in the “Talented and Gifted” program in sciences and mathematics at his school. This allows him to learn at a much faster pace and prepare for his future in the best way possible. His life was turned upside down when he was diagnosed with Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in October 2019. Researchers know little about this extremely rare type of leukemia. Nathanael thus agreed to take part in a research program on the disease. He has already undergone several rounds of chemotherapy, each of which requires a lengthy hospitalization. Fortunately, three of his teachers agreed to accompany him home so that he could keep up with his studies, with excellent results. Recently, Nathanael and his family learned that he would need a bone marrow transplant. As chance would have it, his big brother, a compatible donor, agreed without hesitation to act as his donor. Nathanael’s family have relied heavily on research progress to find less invasive treatments against this disease.